Auditory Processing Challenges

What is auditory processing? Auditory processing is what the brain (central nervous system) does with what it hears. Our bodies and ears process sound 24/7 but it is the brain that registers and interprets the sound in preparation for formulating a response. A deficit in processing skills can lead to poor comprehension, reading, learning, poor muscle control and organizational skills.

Diana has been working with individuals with auditory processing challenges since 2003. Her son, Cameron, started her on the journey of seeking help and finally completing her certification as a Practitioner of The Listening Program. If you want to hear about his journey and see some of his results, CLICK HERE

If people only understood the direct connection between our bodies, learning and sound, they would better understand not only that learning can be impacted by processing sound incorrectly, but also helped by teaching the brain to process all sound.

Staying Current

Every 3 years Diana is required to totally retrain and renew her certification to use TLP (her sound therapy of choice) so you know that she is up to date and in possession of the latest research and ways of using sound therapy to change the brain.

As well, Diana strives to read the latest research and stay on top of changes in the therapeutic, scientific, and educational fields so she can give her clients the best of what there is to offer.

What is Auditory Processing?

Auditory processing is what we do with the sound we hear. In other words, the brain’s ability (ie, the central nervous system) to process incoming auditory signals

Most people don’t realize that sound comes in through our ears but also our entire skeletal body. Did you ever why Beethoven used to put his ear onto the top of the piano to compose music? Or why people with hearing loss will often listen to music with their feet on a speaker?

Sound travels through our entire skeleton as well as in through our ears. There are 2 types of conduction:

  • air conduction (through the ears) and
  • bone conduction (through the skeletal structure)

In the sound therapy I use, we take advantage of both types with sound going through a sensor on top of the head as well as through the ears.

If you have ever wondered why your voice sounds different on a recording than it does to you, it is because you are processing that sound with both air and bone conduction when you speak. When it is recorded, you are only hearing it through air conduction.

Listening is Different to Hearing

Processing sound is much more than just hearing. We can all hear (unless we have a hearing loss). We are born with the skill, and everyone has it.

Listening is a learned skill, and you would know people who do it well, and others that don’t. Hearing is passive, listening is active.

We need to do something with the sound when we listen, and our brain goes to work to interpret the sound in order to invoke a response.

Children with auditory pressing challenges usually appear not to be hearing you when you ask them something.

Getting an audiogram is a wonderful place to start just to make sure there is no hearing loss, but it is common for children with CAPD to have perfect audiograms.

What Causes Central Auditory Processing Disorder?

These are some but not all the causes of CAPD:

  • Early ear infections (otitis media)
  • Middle earl fluid
  • Birth trauma
  • Genetic
  • Organic and traumatic brain injury
  • Malformed corpus callosum
  • Lead and other environmental poisoning
  • Auditory deprivation
  • Toxic noise

If people only understood the direct connection between our bodies, learning and sound, they would better understand not only that learning can be impacted by processing sound incorrectly, but also helped by teaching the brain to process all sound.

diana f cameron

Symptoms of Auditory Processing Challenges

  • Has difficulty listening and paying attention
  • Misunderstands spoken information, directions, or questions
  • Frequently asks “huh?” or “what?”
  • Needs to have directions or information repeated
    Has poor auditory sequential memory
  • Is easily distracted by background noise
  • Finds some sounds uncomfortable or painful
  • Has trouble hearing similarities and differences in sounds
  • Has poor phonics skills

Click here for a larger view

Testing and Assessment

We use a battery of tests to find out exactly where the deficits in learning are occurring so we know how to change the brain to facilitate better learning. It also gives us an accurate way to measure progress. Click to see the range of testing and assessment tools we use.

The Benefits of Sound Therapy

There are numerous benefits of sound therapy, many of which you would not attribute to the effects of sound.